New York Times editor James Bennet resigns after backlasck

New York Times editor James Bennet resigns after backlasck

Sulzberger also said that Jim Dao, an editor-in-chief who had publicly claimed responsibility for overseeing the editing of the piece, would be removed from the masthead and re-assigned to the newsroom. Katie Kingsbury, another page editor, will oversee the editorial page until the 2020 election.

The tectonic restructuring has limited a week of turmoil in the nation’s document, with staff taking part in a debate on the publication of Cotton’s ed-ed and baking the Times leadership for the process that led to it.

“While this was a painful week for the entire company, it provoked urgent and important discussions,” Sulzberger wrote in a note announcing the changes.

Cotton’s piece, published Wednesday, entitled “Send Troops,” argued that the insurgency law could invoke the development of the military across the country to help local law enforcement authorities deal with the unrest caused by the riots. the death of George Floyd.

The op-ed was published in the opinion section of The Times, but the opinion staff and the newsroom – which operate separately from each other – disagree publicly.

Bennett initially defended the execution of the op-ed, but later said it was wrong to publish it and blamed a breach on the drafting process for the error.

“Last week we saw significant damage to our processing, not the first we’ve experienced in recent years,” Sulzberger said in a memo on Sunday, referring to other major problems seen by the Bennett-led think tank. “James and I agreed that a new team would be needed to lead the department in a time of significant change.”

Bennett initially defended the execution of the op-ed, but later said his department was wrong to publish it and accused the editorial board of interrupting the error.

Sulzberger’s announcement that Bennett will leave surprised employees, people who know internal discussions in The Times tell CNN Business.

The One Times employee said the incident sparked significant discussions about systematic racial prejudice and diversity in the newsroom. The individual said such talks have gone deeper than simply securing a different staff and addressing larger issues related to race and the role of the Times in society.

At a town hall with officials on Friday, Sulzberger and Bennett both said the process was not adequate at the moment and had structural problems, a person who was called told CNN Business.

“Last week we saw a significant analysis in our processing processes, not the first we have experienced in recent years.” Sulzberger wrote on Sunday, referring to other major problems that had occurred in the opinion department under the leadership of Bennet. “James and I agreed that a new team would be needed to lead the department in a time of significant change.”

Bennet’s tenure was marked by a series of high profiles.

The Times’ reporting department was allowed to fail in September after a story was reported alleging sexual misconduct against Supreme Court Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

The view is vertical with the heat last summer for the actions of columnist Bret Stephens.

And last April, the opinion department apologized after publishing an anti-Semitic cartoon in its international edition.

The latest catastrophe has drawn criticism from Republicans who have claimed that the newspaper is biased against them.

Cotton strongly criticized The Times for saying that his choice did not meet his standards, noting that Bennett had initially defended the op. Cotton told Fox News that the newspaper had a cave in a “mob of children who woke up.”

“My program does not meet the standards of the New York Times,” Cotton said. “It goes far beyond their standards, which are usually full of left-wing, sophisticated drivel.”

President Trump responded to the news on Sunday by attacking the newspaper in a tweet.

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