NASA spacecraft sends back images of stars 4.3 billion miles away

NASA spacecraft sends back images of stars 4.3 billion miles away

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

Do you have 3D glasses? You can see these stereo images that reveal the distance of the stars from their background. On the left is the Proxima Centauri and on the right is the Wolf 359.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The newly renamed Arrokoth object, once known as Ultima Thule, is infrared, smooth and covered with organic compound molecules, according to new research.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

Another look at Ultima Thule reveals the shape of the pancake that many associate with it.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

New Horizons images revealed that Pluto and Charon craters were made of small Kuiper Belt objects.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

While this may seem more impressive if you’re wearing 3D glasses, this is the first three-dimensional image of the Kuiper Belt Ultima Thule object. The New Horizons flew from Ultima Thule on January 1st.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

This is the first color image of the Ultima Thule, taken 85,000 miles from the New Horizons spacecraft. The “red snowman” replaces the original “bowling” shape believed to have been. This image reveals that the Ultima Thule is actually two objects associated with gravity, making it the first binary contact to visit a spacecraft. The red color is due to the fact that it radiates in the Kuiper zone.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons gave us our first “close-up” look at Ultima Thule on January 1st. On the left there is a composition of two images taken from half a million miles out, showing the size and shape of the object. The impression of an artist on the right suggests that the Ultima Thule is shaped like a bowling alley and rotates like a propeller.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

When NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft flew from Pluto in July 2015, it captured this image of large mountain ranges where it encounters a vast icy plain called Sputnik Planitia. The ridges in these photos have now been identified as dunes from solid methane ice grains.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

New Horizons photographed what scientists call ground “blades” near the heart of the dwarf planet. This 3D image was created using two images taken about 14 minutes on July 14. The first image was taken about 16,000 miles (25,000 kilometers) from Pluto and the second was taken when the spacecraft was 10,000 miles (about 17,000 kilometers) away. Break out your 3-D glasses for the best view.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons team has discovered a chain of exotic mountains covered in methane snow in Pluto. NASA has released an image of the snow-capped mountains extending into the dark area of ​​Cthulhu on March 3.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

NASA released a photo on February 4, 2015, which is suspected to be a picture of floating hills on the surface of Pluto. The hills are made of ice water and hover over a sea of ​​nitrogen.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

This infrared image shows that the ice water is abundant on the surface of Pluto. The image was created using two Pluto scans made by the New Horizons spacecraft on July 14, when the detector was about 67,000 miles (108,000 kilometers) above Pluto.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

These photos show Pluto’s variety of textures, including what NASA calls “rounded and strange mountain textures.” The mountains are unofficially called Tartarus Dorsa. This image shows about 330 miles (530 kilometers) from Pluto’s territory. It combines blue, red and infrared images taken by the spacecraft’s Ralph / Multispectral Visual Imaging camera. The images were taken on July 14, during the flyby of the detector. They were released on September 24.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The photos taken by the New Horizons shortly before his closest approach to Pluto on July 14 are the clearest images to date of Pluto’s varied terrain. This high resolution image reveals details about two icebergs. The image extends 75 miles (120 kilometers) from the surface of Pluto.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

This image of Pluto’s surface was taken just 15 minutes after NASA’s New Horizon spacecraft made its closest approach to the icy planet on July 14. As he stared at the Sun, the spacecraft’s camera captured more than a dozen thin layers of turbidity in Pluto’s atmosphere. , at least 60 miles (100 kilometers) above the surface. The photo was disconnected from Earth on September 13.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

This image of Pluto’s icy and mountainous landscapes was taken from a distance of 11,000 miles (17,700 kilometers). “This image makes you feel like you’re there, in Pluto, to see the landscape for yourself,” said lead researcher Horizons Alan Stern at the Southwest Research Institute in Colorado.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

This image is a composition of new high resolution images that are disconnected from the New Horizons. The large icy plains are nicknamed Sputnik Planum. This image is a view over Pluto’s equatorial region. Astronomers began disconnecting data from the spacecraft on the weekend of Labor Day, September 5-7.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

Scientists say that what looks like mountains can be huge chunks of ice water floating in frozen nitrogen. In the new photos, taken on July 14 and released on September 10, a pixel is 400 meters (440 yards). The nearest passage of the New Horizons from Pluto was about 50,000 miles from the surface.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The landscape of Pluto has a great variety: plains, mountains, craters and it seems to be dunes. The smallest details in the photos are about half a mile wide. The area with the craters is ancient, scientists say. The smooth frozen levels are relatively small.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

Shortly before its closest approach to Pluto on July 14, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft snapped a photo of Charon, Pluto’s largest moon. The photo was taken 290,000 miles away. The area of ​​the north pole of Charon is extremely dark. This photo was released on September 10.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

This new image of Pluto is amazing planetary scientists. It shows the atmosphere of the small world, illuminated by the sun. NASA says the image reveals layers of fog that are several times higher than expected. The photo was taken by the New Horizons spacecraft seven hours after its closest approach to Pluto on July 14. The New Horizons were about 1.25 million miles from Pluto at the time.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

Images taken from Pluto’s heart-shaped figure, unofficially called Tombaugh Regio, reveal a “vast, crater-free plain that appears to be no more than 100 million years old,” NASA said on July 17. The frozen area is “probably still geologically shaped.” NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft was launched in 2006 and traveled 3 billion miles on the dwarf planet.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

Close-ups of an area near Pluto’s equator revealed a huge surprise: a series of young mountains. NASA released the image on July 15.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

Amazing new details about Pluto’s largest moon, Charon, are revealed in this July 15 image.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The latest spectrum analysis by Ralph of New Horizons was released on July 15. It reveals an abundance of methane ice, but with striking differences from place to place across the icy surface of Pluto.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

NASA team members and visitors are counting on the approach of the spacecraft to Pluto on July 14.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

Pluto’s image was taken by New Horizons on July 13, about 16 hours before the nearest approach. The spacecraft was 476,000 miles off the surface of Pluto.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The colors in this image of Pluto and Charon are too much to make it easy to see their different features. (These aren’t the real colors of Pluto and Charon, and the two bodies aren’t really that close in space.) This image was created on July 13, a day before the New Horizons had to make their closest approach to Pluto.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

This image of Pluto was taken by the New Horizons on July 12. The spacecraft was 1.6 million miles from Pluto at the time.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons took this photo of Charon on July 12th. Reveals a system of damage larger than the Grand Canyon. The spacecraft was 1.6 million miles away when the image was taken.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons are about 3.7 million miles from Pluto and Charon when they took this image on July 8.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

Do you see a heart in Pluto? This image was taken on July 7 by the New Horizons when it was about 5 million miles from the planet. Look down to the right and you will see a large bright area – about 1,200 miles across – that looks like a heart.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons took six black-and-white photos of Pluto and Haron between June 23 and 29. The images were combined with color data from another instrument of the space detector to create the above images. The spacecraft was 15 million miles away when the series began and 11 million miles when the last photo was taken.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

Pluto appears here with Haron in pictures taken on June 25 and 27. The image on the right shows a series of dark spots at equal distances near Pluto’s equator. Scientists hope to solve the puzzle as the New Horizons approach Pluto.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons took a series of 13 images of Charon surrounding Pluto in six days in April. As the images were taken, the spacecraft was moved from about 69 million miles by Pluto to 64 million miles.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

Look carefully at the pictures above: they mark the first time the New Horizons photographed the smaller and fainter moons of Pluto, Kerberos and Styx. The images were taken from April 25 to May 1.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons used the color imager to capture this image of Pluto and Charon on April 9th. This was the first color image taken by a spacecraft approaching Pluto and Haron, according to NASA. The spacecraft was about 71 million miles away from Pluto when the photo was taken.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

In August 2014, the New Horizons crossed the orbit of Poseidon, the last planet to travel to Pluto. The New Horizons took this photo of Poseidon and the big moon Triton when it was about 2.45 billion miles from the planet – more than 26 times the distance between Earth and our sun.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons captured this image of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io in early 2007.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

On his way to Pluto, the New Horizons smashed these photos of Jupiter’s four large “Galilean” moons. To the left are Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

A white arrow shows Pluto in this September 2006 photo taken by the New Horizons. The spacecraft was still about 2.6 billion miles from Pluto.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

Pluto was discovered in 1930, but was only a fraction of the light in Earth’s best telescopes until February 2010, when NASA released the image. It was created by combining many images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope – each only a few pixels wide – through a technique called dithering. NASA says it took four years and 20 computers were constantly working to create the image.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

This was one of the best views we had of Pluto and the moon Charon before the New Horizons mission. The image was taken by the Small Space Camera of the European Space Agency’s Hubble Space Telescope on February 21, 1994.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

A picture of the Hubble Space Telescope for Pluto and its moons. Charon is the largest moon near Pluto. The other four bright spots are smaller moons discovered in 2005, 2011 and 2012: Nix, Hydra, Kerberos and Styx.

The New Horizons explores Pluto, the Arocoth

The New Horizons were launched from Florida’s Kennedy Space Center on January 19, 2006. The detector, about the size of a piano, weighed about 1,054 pounds at launch. It has seven instruments for taking photographs and sampling the atmosphere of Pluto. After completing his five-month study of Pluto, the spacecraft will continue to delve deeper into the Kuiper Belt.

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