Lovely eye of the snake captured by Hubble

Lovely eye of the snake captured by Hubble

This magnificent galaxy, NGC 2835, is located near the head of the southern constellation Hydra, the water snake. Credit: ESA / Hubble & NASA, J. Lee and PHANGS-HST. Recognition: Judy Schmidt (Geckzilla)

The twisting patterns created by the NGC 2835’s multiple spiral arms create the illusion of an eye. This is a fitting description, as this magnificent galaxy is located near the head of the southern constellation Hydra, the water snake. This stunning blocked spiral galaxy, just over half the width of the galaxy Galaxy, appears in a great way in this image taken by NASA/THAT Hubble Space Telescope. Although it can not be seen in this picture, an oversized black hole with a mass millions of times that of our Sun is known to nest in the center of NGC 2835.

This galaxy was pictured as part of PHANGS-HST, a large-scale Hubble galaxy study that aims to study the connections between cold gas and new stars in a variety of galaxies in the local universe. Inside NGC 2835, this cold, dense gas produces large numbers of young stars in large star-forming regions. The bright blue areas, usually seen on the outer spiral arms of many galaxies, indicate where ultraviolet light is most intensely emitted, indicating recent or continuous star formation.

Expected to reflect more than 100,000 gas clouds and star-forming regions outside our galaxy, this research hopes to reveal and clarify many of the links between cold gas clouds, star formation, and the overall shape and morphology of galaxies. This initiative is a collaboration with the international Atacama Large Millimeter / submillimeter Array (JUMP) and the European Southern Observatory Very large telescope‘small MUSE through the larger PHANGS program (PI: E. Schinnerer).

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