Glass window bridge and sights of Eleuthera in the Bahamas

Glass window bridge and sights of Eleuthera in the Bahamas

Eleuthera, Bahamas (CNN) – Pleasant and unpretentious, the Bahamas of Eleuthera offers lazy, silent, fingers in the sand, drinks in hand.

The residential island – with a name taken from the Greek word for freedom – is also boldly good-looking.

High cliffs leveled against the Atlantic line on the east coast. To the west, clear waters water abundant beaches and a low rocky strip.

Blissful average temperatures range from the low 70’s F in winter to the low 80’s F in summer.

And a main road runs along the Eleuthera, which stretches for 110 miles, but is only two miles at its widest point.

Stunning natural features have been discovered up and down the island, with some of the most attractive views being at its narrowest and southernmost points.

Study in contrasts

The glass window bridge spans a piece of land separating the deep blue Atlantic Ocean from the Ridge of Eleuthera.

Deborah Brunswick and Craig Waxman / CNN

Located in the darkest part of Eleuthera, the glass window bridge stretches across a 30-meter splash of land, separating the dark, crumbling waters of the Atlantic Ocean from the smooth turquoise shoals of Eleuthera.

The contrast is arresting, especially from the air. With sturdy shoes you can climb the rough karst hill above the bridge for a wider view up and down the thin island through both bodies of water.

Strong storms have long washed away an arch of natural stone that once stood on the site of today’s concrete bridge. But the American artist Winslow Homer managed to capture the arch in his painting around 1885 “Glass window.”

Harsh weather and inflating seas can lead to bridge closures and dangerous situations, so it’s best to avoid the area when conditions are bad.

Absorption of nature

The Queen's Bath is a series of natural pools carved into the rock by the crashing Atlantic.

The Queen’s Bath is a series of natural pools carved into the rock by the crashing Atlantic.

Marnie Hunter / CNN

About half a mile south of the glass window bridge is another stunning element worth visiting.

The Queen’s Bath is a series of natural pools carved into the rock by centuries-old surfing on the wild Atlantic side of Eleuthera.

The surf is washed in the pools for refreshing immersion when the outside temperatures are warm but not hot. When it gets hotter, the pools are warmed by the sun to a bath-like temperature.

It is best to visit when the tide is relatively low and skip it completely when the surf is rough. Rocky “bath” surfaces are quite sharp and water shoes or tennis shoes are a must.

Both the bridge and the baths are about a 15-minute drive from North Eleuthera Airport, which welcomes direct flights from Atlanta, Fort Lauderdale and Miami during a normal trip.

Castaway insulation as long as it lasts

An island that boasts more than a fair share of beautiful beaches has a harder-to-reach stretch of sand that requires extra effort.

About two hours south of the bridge with glass windows, on the southernmost peak of Eleuthera, Lighthouse Beach boasts the kind of island isolation found in the most seductive screens.

A Jeep or SUV is best suited for navigation on rocky, impassable roads.

The payout? Nice powdery pink sand on the Atlantic side of the island. An old lighthouse sits on the limestone towering over the ocean, and the great snorkeling and beautiful views over the crescent pier add to the captivating remoteness of the place.

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